How to fix the Baseball Hall of Fame

1. Expand the ballot to 12-15 selections.

Ten Baseball Hall of Famers pose outside the museum in Cooperstown, June 12, 1939. Front row; Eddie Collins, Babe Ruth, Connie Mack, Cy Young. Back row: Honus Wagner, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Tris Speaker, Napoleon Lajoie, George Sisler and Walter Johnson.

Ten Baseball Hall of Famers pose outside the museum in Cooperstown, June 12, 1939. Front row; Eddie Collins, Babe Ruth, Connie Mack, Cy Young. Back row: Honus Wagner, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Tris Speaker, Napoleon Lajoie, George Sisler and Walter Johnson.

When the Hall of Fame was instituted in 1939 there were only 16 Major League Baseball Teams. Hall of Fame voters were limited to only 10 people per ballot and they only voted on it every three years.  Over the course of history the balloting has changed to every year, the number of teams have doubled, yet the number of players each voter is allowed to place on the ballot has remained the same. With nearly twice as many players to choose from, the ballot should clearly be expanded. The logic behind that being that if there are nearly twice as many players then doesn't it make sense that there might be nearly twice as many Hall of Famers?

2. Make all ballots public

Transient

Make every ballot public, this will force the voters to defend themselves when they do idiotic things like leaving their ballot blank, or only voting for Jack Morris. If these guys have a problem defending there votes, then strip the vote from them. For crying out loud, they are baseball writers, they're supposed to write about this stuff, so make them write a column explaining why they voted for who they did and not others.

3. Give current Hall of Famers a vote

It's cool that every living Heisman trophy winner gets to vote on all subsequent Heisman awards. Hall of Famers should get a vote as well. They've earned it. It won't alter the outcome that much, but it would have been enough to push Craig Biggio over the top this year.

4. Include broadcasters, not just writers.

Guys like Vin Scully should have a vote.

Guys like Vin Scully should have a vote.

Guys who have been broadcasting games via TV or radio for over ten years should get a vote. They follow the game more closely than many of the writers who get a vote and these guys watch 162+ games per year and get to see every player over the course of a few years. 

5. Take the vote away from writers that no longer cover MLB.  

If a dude used to be a baseball writer, but now writes for Golf Digest or Southern Living then guess what, he should be required to relinquish his vote. Sorry dude, you're too busy writing about Tiger or a new casserole dish, you don't have time to comment on backdoor sliders anymore.